Behaviour management in the nursery

Behaviour management in the nursery.

We believe that a shared approach to dealing with behavioural difficulties is essential so we will always involve parents/carers in developing and implementing appropriate plans for dealing with difficult behaviour.

In the Nursery, we will deal with difficult behaviour by:

  • Creating a calm, caring environment where children are treated with respect
  • Providing structure within this environment where the children can be free to choose and experiment
  • Agreeing on acceptable and unacceptable behaviour within the Nursery and sharing this with all newcomers both children and adults to ensure consistency
  • Adults will provide a positive model for the children taking into account friendliness, care and courtesy
  • PHYSICAL PUNISHMENT SUCH AS SMACKING OR SHAKING WILL NOT BE USED OR THREATENED BY ANY ADULT OR CHILD IN THE NURSERY

Behaviour Management Policy

In the Nursery we believe that for children to grow and prosper both socially and intellectually they need the support of a warm, friendly, environment where adults make them feel secure, appreciated and respected, and where they can try out various ways of acting and interacting without fear of humiliation, blame or neglect. We will work within the Children Act 1989/2004 guidelines on behaviour and sanctions, namely that children should be respected and that corporal punishment (slapping, smacking, or shaking etc) will not be acceptable practice in the Sue Hedley Nursery School, although it may be necessary to take physical action in an emergency to prevent personal injury or serious damage to property.

 

The following strategies will be undertaken to manage children’s behaviour

We will adopt a problem solving approach to behaviour management. This approach will be explained to staff during the induction process and to parents/carers when the child attends the nursery.

We believe that children flourish in a calm caring environment so we will ensure that children are treated with respect and all communication will be guiding and supportive not directive or controlling.

We believe that children need structure within which they can be free to choose and experiment so we will set limits for children and maintain them consistently.

We believe that children appreciate explanations and suggestions of other ways to act so we will always offer a reason for saying ‘no’ and offer an alternative.

We believe that children need their energies for trying out new behaviour, not for worrying about past inappropriate behaviour so we will deal with difficult situations as they arise, and not postpone addressing the problem to a later point in time.

We believe that children will begin to realise that adults mean what they say when problems are addressed in a consistent way and will respond positively to requests for behaviour change.

We believe that a shared approach to dealing with behavioural difficulties is essential so we will always involve parents/carers in developing and implementing appropriate plans for dealing with difficult behaviour.

We believe that parents should be informed on the day, of any significant incidents relating to the child’s behaviour.

 

Behaviour Management Procedure

Introduction

Children need to have set boundaries of behaviour for their own safety and the safety of others.

 

Aim

We aim to set these boundaries in a way which helps the child to develop a sense of the significance of their own behaviour both on their own environment and those around them taking into consideration the age and stage of development of the children.

 

Responsibilities

  • To create calm, caring environment where children are treated with respect.
  • To ensure consistency, all staff will agree on acceptable and unacceptable behaviour and will share this with parent/carers and children.
  • To ensure staff will provide positive role models for the children e.g. care courtesy and friendliness.

 

Actions to be taken

In the Nursery we are trained to use the High Scope problem solving approach to conflict. The main points are:

  •  Approach calmly.
  • Acknowledge feelings.
  • Gather information.
  • Restate the problem.
  • Ask for solutions and choose one together with the child.
  • Be prepared to give follow up support.

We prevent conflict occurring by:

  • Providing enough space and variety of materials.
  • Establishing a consistent balanced routine.
  • Supporting children’s choices and interests.
  • Planning for transitions.
  • Keeping waiting periods, short and active.
  • Accepting behavioural differences.
  • Respecting children’s ideas, concern and feelings.
  • Setting reasonable limits and expectations.
  • Stopping destructive and aggressive behaviour.
  • Using observations in daily planning.